Where’s my WiFi, Dad?

Upset and angry boy

Kids have everything these days. Ok, maybe not everything, but they have a lot more than I ever had growing up. That’s generally how it goes from generation to generation. The next generation benefits from the progress of the previous generation.

I laughed when my son sardonically exclaimed, “where’s my wifi, dad?” but it also hit a nerve. He was joking but it got me thinking, maybe I need to ensure that he appreciates all these free services that I’m paying for.

What was he doing at the time? He was watching some show on YouTube. Whatever it is the kids watch, it generally generates a lot of sniggers and belly-laughs; very annoying when I’m trying to watch my own show (mental note: need to check again what they’re watching)!

So, why the, “where’s my wifi, dad?” Well, his WiFi dropped while watching his show.

How do I teach him a bit of a lesson. The most obvious way is to cut off his precious WiFi altogether. I could have done that, but I thought it was too much trouble. Also, I was busy watching another show so blocking his WiFi signal could potentially block mine as well. It struck me that this kind of attitude of laziness/self-interest on my behalf might not be the best lesson for my son.

The irony of all this is that our company develops web and mobile apps to do just this. If I only had that app, not only could I block my son’s WiFi access but I could also ensure that my WiFi remained unaffected; a win/win all around!

You see, I understand how to configure a WiFi router and make the changes required to block his device but then I would have to go finding usernames, passwords, IP addresses and everything else required to change the settings on his device. I would have to pause my show, get up and actually move; I might even have to read a user manual (yuck!)…way too much effort!

Now, if I had something simple, like an app or web portal that had all connected devices listed, then I could just pick the device with the picture of my son on it, tap on it, and cut off his WiFi. What fun I would have, and people might even think that I’m good at this parenting lark. All this can all happen with minimum interruption to my show and wouldn’t even require any elevation in my heart rate beyond the initial annoyance of my son’s query.

Of course, the first few times would generate a few tantrums but a good parent will always go above and beyond for his kids— so long as it does not require too much effort!
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